Why Energy Benchmarking Is For You

Energy benchmarking is an extremely valuable tool in today’s energy marketplace. However, many who manage energy portfolios today are not taking advantage of the resources available to benchmark their facility. Anecdotally, I have found, this is due in large part to the fact many do not know or understand what benchmarking is.

When you benchmark your facility, you are tracking the total electricity, natural gas, steam, water and other utility that your building consumes. In many circles, this is also known as your building performance. Once you have collected the requisite data, you can compare your building performance to facilities that are similar in size and operation to your own.

I recently took time to meet with a colleague, Justin Kale of Energility, to better understand the value proposition of energy benchmarking. Justin is a specialist in this field and shared the following thought.

“Benchmarking is similar to the use of a compass when navigating a path. It is a great way to establish where you’re at and monitor your position over time. This enables you to see how far you have come over a period of time with respect to building energy performance.”

Benchmarking provides the busy CEO, CFO or facility management team, baseline information to be able to compare the energy portfolio of their building to other buildings in their peer group. Once you identify areas for improvement, you can begin to craft an energy plan. Benchmarking gives those same professionals the opportunity to prioritize the deployment of capital resources or achieve recognition for past project implementation.

There are a number of great resources that are accessible in the marketplace to help facility managers to benchmark their performance. One of the more prominent tools is the Energy Star Portfolio Manager. It was created by the EPA to be an “online tool you can use to measure and track energy and water consumption, as well as greenhouse gas emissions”.

Benchmarking will enable facilities to make informed decisions on where investments should be made regarding their capital projects. Ultimately, knowing how your building operates and where weaknesses exist will allow you to reduce consumption, costs, and operational expenses. Furthermore, benchmarking is a process that many can do on their own by leveraging the tools in the marketplace. Whether through the EPA and its Energy Star programs or the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, the resources exist to manage this process on your own.

The final thought I will leave you with is benchmarking can aid you in staying ahead of impending energy mandates and legislation. Whether federal or local, the energy landscape is rapidly changing. It will prove far less costly to become energy efficient on your timetable rather than someone else’s.

As always, if you have questions or concerns about energy benchmarking, consult an energy adviser to help you make the best and most informed decision.

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