Ohio’s Ranking Drops on ACEEE Scorecard for Energy Efficiency

Every year, ACEEE (American Council for Energy-Efficient Economy) ranks states on their energy efficiency policy and program efforts and also provides recommendations for ways that states can improve their energy performance. The State Scorecard is a benchmark, which serves to encourage states to continue “strengthening their efficiency commitments as a pragmatic and effective strategy for promoting economic growth, securing environmental benefits, and increasing their communities’ resilience in the face of the uncertain costs and supplies of the energy resources on which they depend.” Last week, the 2015 State Scorecards were released and Ohio was ranked 27th. This is a drop from Ohio’s 2014 placement at 25th.

This drop in ranking is no surprise after Ohio became the first state to reverse energy efficiency and renewable fuel mandates in 2014. Ohio Governor John Kasich signed Senate Bill 310 in 2014, which froze annually-increasing energy mandates until the year 2017. At which point, the “the automatic levels are to be restored”, a provision that Kasich requested to be part of the legislation, according to The Plain Dealer (Cleveland). The bill also included language that establishes a legislative study committee tasked with evaluating the effectiveness and future of the original portfolio standards.

Senate Bill 310 counteracted Ohio Senate Bill 221, which was passed in 2008 and established the efficiency standard. Under Senate Bill 221, Ohio ranked #1 in the nation for advance energy and renewables, “bringing in more renewable energy facilities than any other state,” according to JobsOhio. Under the legislation, utilities can count improvements made by their own customers and also roll over any savings above a given target into the next year. Language in SB 310 created a provision that permits large industrial users to opt-out of utility offered programs; allowing these users to develop and institute internal programs. Concern has arisen that this may adversely impact the effectiveness of the utility offered programs; potentially increasing the cost and burden of compliance on smaller commercial entities.

Overall, the passage of SB 310 has negatively impacted the implementation of commercial energy efficiency retrofits throughout the First Energy territory. Unlike other state utilities, First Energy has opted to discontinue any rebates for energy efficiency work performed by its customers. As a result, there has been a decline in the number of small and mid-size commercial entities instituting energy efficiency related projects. This concern may persist beyond the current two-year freeze in place under SB 310.

Recently, the legislative study committee released a report recommending an indefinite freeze on the mandates. This has largely been met with criticism from environmental groups, politicians and industrial entities alike. In response, Governor Kasich stated that “a continued freeze of Ohio’s energy standards is unacceptable”. There is much debate still to take place before a final determination is made on the future of Ohio’s renewable and energy efficiency portfolio standards. EPCO will continue to provide additional review and analysis as more information becomes available.

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