Understanding ASHRAE Level Audits

DSC_7446 (2)EPCO performs energy audits, or energy assessments, for commercial businesses throughout Ohio. Depending on geographic region, there may be utility incentives to cover the cost of the audit. Not all energy audits are made equal, and it is essential to understand the various levels of audits available. The primary goals of an energy audit are to determine how the building energy systems are performing, how improvements can be made to enhance that performance, and how those improvements will affect the owner in both financial and non-financial factors.

Energy audits vary in depth and complexity, depending on a variety of factors including building energy systems configurations, project parameters, and the capabilities the energy auditor can provide. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) has defined three levels of audits that energy providers perform, which I will explain in greater detail.

ASHRAE Level 1 – Walk Through Analysis / Preliminary Audit

The ASHRAE Level-1 audit is the starting point for building energy optimization. This audit involves a review of the facility’s utility bills and operating data, a brief walk-through of the building and basic interviews with on-site operating personnel. This audit is intended to identify areas for potential energy improvements, understand the building configuration, and define the type and nature of energy systems. Your energy advisor should give you a short report detailing findings from the audit, which should identify an array of efficiency opportunities. Typically this report does not include detailed recommendations for improvement, with the exception of very visible operational and project flaws.

The ASHRAE Level-1 audit should help the energy team at a business establish a baseline for measuring energy improvements, and also give them an idea of how their building performs in relation to similar businesses. A common example can be found among many school systems. Often, they will have comprehensive controls in place for systems such as process cooling or heating. But, after years of evolving use, those control set points need to be recalibrated to align with existing facility use.

ASHRAE Level 2 – Energy Survey and Analysis

The ASHRAE Level-2 assessment builds upon the findings of Level-1, and evaluates the building energy systems in detail to define potential energy efficiency improvements. This should include the lighting, ventilation, building envelope, heating, and air conditioning (HVAC), domestic hot water (DHW), compressed air and process cooling or heating. This audit starts with a detailed energy cost and consumption analysis. Then, the assessment should evaluate air quality, lighting, humidity, temperature, ventilation, and other conditions that could influence energy performance or comfort of facility occupants. ASHRAE Level-2 should include in-depth discussions with the building management, ownership, and occupants to examine potential problem areas, and determine their goals for increasing energy efficiency.

Your energy advisor should provide you with a clear and concise report that includes a briefing to the building owner and management team, explaining a variety of Energy Efficiency Measures (EEMs) including operational changes, no-cost and low-cost measures, system controls and building automation modifications, and potential fiscal upgrades. The findings of this audit should also include performance metrics, as well as a method for the building owner to determine the next steps in proceeding with implementation of the plan. Anybody that hasn’t actively been involved with energy efficiency nor have an energy portfolio, we may put under the Level-2 umbrella. Very likely there is a cost associated with this audit, but depending on your geographic location, rebates may cover a good portion of it.

Recently, I had the opportunity to collaborate with a mid-size regional medical facility that asked us to complete an in-depth analysis regarding replacement of their existing HVAC system in exchange for a more efficient solution. Due to the complexity of the system and unique operation of the facility, equipment metering and engineering was required to identify the appropriate solution for the building’s needs. This required a cost, but the majority was covered through local utility incentives.

ASHRAE Level 3 – Detailed Analysis of Capital Intensive Modifications

The ASHRAE Level-3 audit is a very in-depth and detailed energy assessment. This audit involves data collection over the course of weeks or even months. Data loggers will monitor temperatures of affective space, lighting levels, pumps and motors operation, switching behavior, and other factors. This audit requires an intensive facility-wide assessment. We try to steer our clients away from this audit if at all possible, due to its high cost and length of time required. We would only perform this audit in specific situations. One such example would be businesses governed by strict regulations that mandate this level of reporting on an annual or semi-annual basis.

Conclusion

A carefully crafted energy plan will empower your business with the ability to more seamlessly manage your energy portfolio. At EPCO, we design a plan that factors each component of your specific energy fingerprint, including how you use energy, when it’s consumed, and most importantly, where you can save without disruption to your operation.  Whether you move forward immediately with each measure, or wait for a more opportune time, you will be better informed and prepared. For more information on energy planning, contact eauerbach@energyplanners.com or 216.559.4103

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4 Essential Tips to Prepare for the Next Recession

2016 is off to a rocky start and some economists are predicting a recession. Over the first two weeks of the year, the markets are trading down over eight percent. Chinese stocks have dropped more than 20 percent and have entered into bear-market territory. As the second-largest economy behind the United States, a slump of this nature will have an indisputable effect. Regardless of the direct fiscal impact to the U.S., the volatility in China will continue to send ripples through the global economy.recession-blog-photo

The dramatic decline in oil prices will also play a large role in the instability of the US economy. The price per barrel has dropped below $30; a 12-year low. The past year has seen prices plummet nearly 39 percent and almost 17 percent in just the past month. This has certainly been met with glee by consumers, as the price at the pump has dropped below an average of two dollars nationwide. However, the players on the world stage aren’t nearly as elated. China’s woes have further exasperated the market while oil producing states, such as Saudi Arabia and Russia, have seen dramatic declines in profits. Many smaller fracking and energy companies in the U.S. may be forced to shut down as well.

Furthermore, the fiscal policy of the Federal Reserve has amplified volatility. Continued tightening of monetary policy will reinforce the dollar’s strength and weaken U.S. exports. In turn, this could negatively impact the manufacturing sector, which represents over 12 percent of the U.S. GDP, and nearly nine percent of total employment (in 2013). Many news outlets have cited a December Citi Research report projecting the likelihood of a recession in 2016 at 65 percent, the highest odds in several years.

As the economy continues to foster uncertainty and instability, I am advising many of my clients to begin taking steps to protect themselves against a potential recession by years end. Here are four industry tips to get you started.

1. Evaluate Existing Contracts
•  Review in detail all your current and proposed equipment maintenance and service contracts. Be sure all maintenance and service agreements have significant returns on investment. Don’t simply allow contracts to roll over; instead negotiate for the best terms possible.
•  Evaluate your gas and electric generation contracts. Be knowledgeable on the current state of the market. It is extremely likely there has been a dramatic shift in market conditions since your last contract. Review with your energy advisor if you are uncertain on prevailing market value or contract terms.

2. Modify Behaviors: Little Changes Can Cause Big Savings
•  Turn off ancillary office machines and lighting when not in use.
•  Shut down non-essential equipment during down-time in production.
•  Evaluate facility energy systems to remove vampire power in standby mode.

3. Institute Controls and Energy Management Systems
•  Install a comprehensive controls platform and dashboard to enable you to monitor and manage your energy systems from one devise.
•  Mount sensors when possible to ensure systems such as lighting aren’t in perpetual use.
• Incorporate variable frequency drives (VFDs) on mechanical equipment to control the speed and energy output of motors.

4. Create a New Income Stream-Take advantage of the suite of utility rebates, tax incentives and financing structures that will increase your energy portfolio’s return on investment.
• Enroll in the “RIGHT” demand response program that will compensate you for curtailing energy usage at times when the grid is overly taxed.
• Talk to your advisor about maximizing energy related tax deductions (EPAct 179D) and capitalizing on accelerated depreciation.
• Take advantage of the many financing solutions available that provide immediate net savings for energy related projects. These are offered by many traditional banking institutions, Port Authorities, PACE financing agencies, and in the form of Energy Service Agreements (ESAs) by reputable energy planning companies.

The markets and the economy are cyclical. It is inevitable that we will have downturns and recessionary periods. We cannot predict what the next recession may look like, but we can take steps to lessen its effect. Working with an energy advisor, instituting long term energy management plans, and making low-to-no-cost investments, will better protect your business, resources and most importantly your wallet.

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2016 Energy Industry Predictions

2016-energy-predictions-blog2015 has proven to be a very interesting and dynamic year in energy. Events large and small have had an economic impact both globally and locally across the country. A few notable highlights include this year being the hottest year on record, oil prices trading below $35 a barrel, and renewable energy possibly reaching a global tipping point.

I have spoken to many clients over the past couple of months inquiring about what 2016 has in store. The most frequent inquires I get pertain to what will happen with the markets, legislation, and regulations affecting how they will do business in the upcoming year.

I spent the better part of the fourth quarter researching and interviewing fellow industry experts to ascertain where the industry will go in 2016. Below are my energy industry predictions for 2016.

  • Nationally, the supply of natural gas is up compared to this time last year. The regional transmission grid (PJM) serving Ohio has announced it has adequate capacity to meet energy demands this winter. This winter is projected to be warmer than average. Taken collectively, this means businesses should expect energy prices in our region to trend lower and costs to be down this winter compared to last year.
  • After two consecutive summers of dramatically increasing electric rates, consumers in northeast Ohio can expect much better pricing during the summer of 2016. Many consumers wisely locked into longer two and three year fixed rate contracts over the past two years. For a large number of consumers, those contracts are expiring during the first half of 2016. Now is the time to explore new contract terms with your energy advisor.
  • LED lighting technology, efficiency, and pricing improved dramatically over the past year. Though there will continue to be improvements to the technology, it is unlikely the industry will achieve improved pricing at quite the same rate. Businesses that have been waiting to install LEDs until the market reaches a plateau on pricing, may want to consider 2016 as the year to make their move.
  • Contrary to popular belief, there are still incentives available for energy efficiency retrofits; you just need to know where to look. There is a very good likelihood that SB 310, which froze the energy portfolio standards in Ohio, will expire by the end of the year. That means businesses could expect a return of the rebates First Energy once offered. But large electric consumers still have incentives they can capitalize on in the form of an exemption to costly riders attached to their electric use. Businesses should consult their energy advisors to learn more.
  • Columbia Gas of Ohio customers will continue to have access to favorable rebates. Columbia provides service to a majority of counties throughout Ohio. Their rebate program is very comprehensive extending from residential to commercial and new construction.
  • President Obama’s Clean Power Plan will continue to foster dialogue and potential turmoil within the energy market. State lawmakers and utilities have cited that the plans objectives will prove prohibitively costly to plant operations. A number of states, including Ohio, have already filed suit against the EPA in court. Either way, the end result will affect energy markets.
  • The Federal Government passed, and signed into law, a $1.1 trillion budget and tax extenders bill at the end of 2015. Included was an extension of Section 179D in the tax code that allows for qualifying businesses to receive up to $1.80 per square foot in deductions for eligible energy efficiency projects.

The energy markets are historically too volatile to perfectly predict. One certainty though is those businesses that are prepared with a plan are better insulated against unexpected weather anomalies, global crises, and unforeseen regulations. Be sure to consult with your energy advisor about implementing a contingency to properly manage your energy portfolio in 2016!

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4 Proven Steps to Get the Best Electric Utility Rate

electric-utility-dealOhio’s SB3 deregulated the electric market in 1999, and by 2001, commercial and industrial businesses were able to select their own electric generation suppliers. However, by 2008, 90% of the market still acquired their generation from their utility directly. The intent behind deregulation was to increase competition through “shopping” and ultimately drive down pricing for the consumer.

Today, many businesses are seeing the benefit of shopping beyond their utility to service their electric generation. Despite this, most clients I work with haven’t fully taken advantage of the increased competitive landscape. In my experience, mid-market businesses shop similarly (if not identically) to the small commercial and residential markets. Mid-market businesses typically field offers from brokers and suppliers; evaluate a fixed rate option versus a variable rate option; and consider one, two or three year terms.

This method of shopping will certainly get a deal done, but leaves substantial savings on the table for larger energy intensive businesses. Let’s evaluate this concept further using two examples.

Example 1:  A local hardware store is in need of a new electric generation contract. They use 28,000 kWh annually and approach a broker about a potential deal. The broker fields a few offers in the market and returns with the best option. A two-year fixed rate deal at 6.85 cents per kWh. Over the course of the agreement, our hardware store owner will pay a total of $3,836 for their electric generation.

Perhaps if they had used an energy advisor, they may have saved 2/10 of a penny per kWh. That a savings of about $112 or nearly $5 per month. In truth, that’s probably not enough savings for our hardware store owner to fret over. Shopping on their own would likely work just as effectively. But for larger energy intensive businesses, the difference of a few tenths of a penny could be substantial.

Example 2: A mid-sized manufacturer that consumes 6 million kWh annually is looking for a new electric contract. The facility director for the plant approaches a broker and inquiries about what electric contract would be best for the business. The broker then evaluates a few options and returns with the best deal. As a larger user, the manufacturer has increased purchasing power. As such, they receive a more favorable rate of 6.55 cents per kWh for a two-year fixed rate contract. Over the term of the agreement, our manufacturer will pay $786,000.

However, had they utilized a knowledgeable energy advisor, they could conceivably have secured a deal that was 3/10 of a penny less per kWh. Over the course of a two-year agreement, that amounts to a savings of $36,000 or $1,500 per month. Almost all my clients would consider that a savings worth pursuing.

The logical question our manufacturer would now ask is how they can take advantage of that better pricing. Below are some helpful tips to get the best deal possible for your business’ unique energy portfolio.

  1. Explore shopping through an auction platform. Suppliers will offer only one price while brokers may provide two or three. On an auction platform, you have access to every potential supplier in the market bidding for your business.
  2. Most businesses choose between a fixed rate and variable rate option. Consider a blend of both, where you capitalize on rates when they are low while insulating yourself against potential market volatility.
  3. Do not wait to shop until a month or two prior to your existing contract expiration. The closer to expiration, the higher the pricing will be. Begin exploring options at least six month beforehand.
  4. Try to buy when pricing trends lower during the winter months. As demand declines during the cold season, so too does the pricing in the market.

Be sure to work with your energy advisor to understand the complexities of shopping for an electric contract and securing the best option for you and your business.

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The Time to Shop for Your Natural Gas is Now

It’s hard to believe, but the summer is slowly winding to a close. Even though days are still long and temperatures are high, now is when you want to start thinking about your natural gas contract.

Many businesses, non-profits, and residential consumers only consider their natural gas rate in few instances. It may be when winter arrives and the heat gets turned on or simply when your current contract expires. After all, for most, natural gas comprises a relatively small percentage of monthly expenses.

There is however a number of non-residential entities that pay a considerable amount for natural gas through the winter. This includes manufacturers, hospitals, schools, and even churches. In some cases, reducing rates by a matter of cents can add up to thousands in annual savings.

We have seen the adverse effect a cold winter can have on the budget. Just think back to the beginning of 2014 when the nation was overcome by the polar vortex. This of course was unexpected for most and hit many hard in the wallet.

Now though is the perfect time to negotiate your natural gas rate. Currently, gas reserves are up more than 5 percent over last year and prices have trended down these past 12-months. As we get closer to the winter season, the prices will go up. This is a function of supply and demand. Purchasing now enables you to capitalize on lower rates. If you signed a 12-month contract at a higher rate, renewing now will save you money during the following winter.

You have several options for exploring a natural gas contact. If you are a smaller consumer, there are programs through your utility and local brokers you can work with. Be sure to understand the terms of the contract offered and the fine print. Consult an energy advisor if you are unclear about any terms in the contract.

Additionally, most local chambers of commerce will offer their membership what is known as community aggregation programs. If you are not already part of your local chamber, you may want to consider exploring the many benefits they can offer.

If you are a larger consumer, spending perhaps $10,000 monthly on energy or more, there are additional options available to you. The market has become rather sophisticated with a number of products to select from. Though you may be experienced in managing your companies’ energy portfolio, it certainly would benefit you to explore options with your energy advisor to ensure you are making the most informed decision.

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Why Energy Benchmarking Is For You

Energy benchmarking is an extremely valuable tool in today’s energy marketplace. However, many who manage energy portfolios today are not taking advantage of the resources available to benchmark their facility. Anecdotally, I have found, this is due in large part to the fact many do not know or understand what benchmarking is.

When you benchmark your facility, you are tracking the total electricity, natural gas, steam, water and other utility that your building consumes. In many circles, this is also known as your building performance. Once you have collected the requisite data, you can compare your building performance to facilities that are similar in size and operation to your own.

I recently took time to meet with a colleague, Justin Kale of Energility, to better understand the value proposition of energy benchmarking. Justin is a specialist in this field and shared the following thought.

“Benchmarking is similar to the use of a compass when navigating a path. It is a great way to establish where you’re at and monitor your position over time. This enables you to see how far you have come over a period of time with respect to building energy performance.”

Benchmarking provides the busy CEO, CFO or facility management team, baseline information to be able to compare the energy portfolio of their building to other buildings in their peer group. Once you identify areas for improvement, you can begin to craft an energy plan. Benchmarking gives those same professionals the opportunity to prioritize the deployment of capital resources or achieve recognition for past project implementation.

There are a number of great resources that are accessible in the marketplace to help facility managers to benchmark their performance. One of the more prominent tools is the Energy Star Portfolio Manager. It was created by the EPA to be an “online tool you can use to measure and track energy and water consumption, as well as greenhouse gas emissions”.

Benchmarking will enable facilities to make informed decisions on where investments should be made regarding their capital projects. Ultimately, knowing how your building operates and where weaknesses exist will allow you to reduce consumption, costs, and operational expenses. Furthermore, benchmarking is a process that many can do on their own by leveraging the tools in the marketplace. Whether through the EPA and its Energy Star programs or the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory, the resources exist to manage this process on your own.

The final thought I will leave you with is benchmarking can aid you in staying ahead of impending energy mandates and legislation. Whether federal or local, the energy landscape is rapidly changing. It will prove far less costly to become energy efficient on your timetable rather than someone else’s.

As always, if you have questions or concerns about energy benchmarking, consult an energy adviser to help you make the best and most informed decision.

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Can a Single Business Battle the Effects of Climate Change?

Is it possible for just one person or one business to battle the effects of climate change? Perhaps a more appropriate way to evaluate that question is to simply ask if you and your business could. It seems like an unrealistic expectation; the idea that a single company can impact a global crisis. Such a goal may not be as out of reach as you may think.

Earth

Let’s take a step back for a moment to appropriately set the stage. Recently, a peer reviewed article outlining the critical effects of climate change began receiving some notable attention from outlets such as CNN and USA Today. The research article painted a grim and distributing image of what Earth’s future may look like in the absence of necessary change in global human behavior.

Originally appearing in Science Advances, the premise of the article argues that Earth is possibly facing the 6th mass extinction event in the planets history. Since 1900, nearly 500 species have gone extinct. During that period, historical data indicates that number should have been just 9.

Arguably, the most alarming conclusion is that the loss of biodiversity would lead to a mass extinction event in as little as three generations. According to the CNN article, the data shows it is possible for humans to wipe out nearly 75% of species on Earth if drastic and needed changes aren’t made. That window to effect change is rapidly closing.

Scientists are not the only ones advocating for considerable change in human behavior. In June, the Pope published a manifesto regarding climate change. In his writings, the Pope argued the reckless behavior of humanity is adversely affecting our planet; a common good that we all must take care of.

Whether advocated by science or the Pope, the steps we all can take amount to the same. It boils down to reducing your carbon footprint. This simple concept is the impetus for energy efficiency, and the foundation for all that I do with my clients. Regardless of your motivations for energy efficient behavior, we each can do our part.

Let’s revisit our original premise. It is difficult still to imagine that a single person or company can effect change on a global scale. But what happens when millions of people and thousands of companies work in concert.

At the end of the day, it wasn’t simply one business, government, or entity that created this problem. It was countless participants, spanning decades, within countries around the globe. Each has played a singular role in what is quickly developing into a global catastrophe.  It stands to reason that we can reverse this trend in much the same way; one business and one person at a time, doing their part.

The one remaining question is what role you will play moving forward…

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Energy Efficiency: Transaction vs. Consultative Approach

Tell me if this scenario sounds familiar. You’ve been tasked with managing the energy portfolio for a building. Your company may be a manufacturer, hospital, school or commercial real estate property. Regardless of your specific operation, the common thread is that you likely have a very small operating budget, minimal staff, and host of ongoing issues that land on your desk.

You want to be proactive; planning for future issues before they arise, but the resources you are given forces you to be reactive.

As I meet with clients in varying industries, I continually hear this same narrative. To add insult to injury, many of these managers express the challenge of juggling additional responsibilities outside their defined position. Obviously, this further strains their budget, time, and personnel.

Building Construction

This struggle sets the stage for two opposed energy management methods, transaction versus consultative.

A transaction sale can be categorized by solutions that are specific to equipment failure or end of life. You would see this for example with an old boiler or HVAC unit. After decades of operation, they simply stop working. This requires the consumer to engage in a point of sale transaction.

Usually, the replacement comes with a premium cost because of the urgency. In many cases, this could easily erase whatever capital budget you had planned to use for energy efficient upgrades.

Contrary to a reactive transaction is a more proactive consultative approach. We can simplify this with two specific examples.

In the first example, your energy advisor can help you address the unique pain points your facility must deal with. A common one I often come across are issues with facility lighting. It may surprise you to learn that with older lighting technology, you will experience over time lumen degradation. This is a fancy way to say your fixtures aren’t emitting as brightly today as they did when first installed.

(A simple solution for this is to install an LED fixture. Prices for LED solutions have come down dramatically and have become more economical. The life of an LED fixtures last substantively longer than outmoded CFL solutions.)

The second example is the purest form of energy consultation. In this instance, your energy advisor would work alongside you to draft a comprehensive energy management plan. This includes identifying all existing pain points, categorizing remaining equipment life, and producing an analysis on potential retrofit costs and payback periods. This latter portion should factor available incentives and rebates as well as creative or alternative financing mechanisms.

This enables you to prepare, well into the future, for all contingencies and eventualities. You can include capital improvement projects in annual budgets, factor in the energy savings, and ultimately avoid untimely failures that can dramatically disrupt production.

For many dealing with complex energy issues, transaction selling has become the norm. Emerging resources in the market can help you better plan, prepare and manage energy portfolios. Leveraging an advisor can enable you to develop a more structured approach and avoid the roller coaster that has been your energy management strategy to date.

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Should Businesses Invest in Wind and Solar?

Recently, I had the opportunity to visit a friend in Colorado. It was a trip designed to give me some much needed R&R and a chance to hike, run, and just be out in nature; the latter of which I should probably do much more often. Despite being a recreational trip, the energy consultant in me couldn’t help but notice the prevalence of renewable technology… everywhere. It was common to see turbines and solar farms or houses whose rooftops were lined with solar panels. It was an interesting contrast compared to Ohio.

I had asked my friend, a celebrated thought leader in the sustainability industry, how solar, wind, and other renewables became so prevalent around Colorado. The answer was really quite simple. People wanted it. From consumers to legislators, it was a function of demand and political will. There is a burgeoning industry of installers and a fair amount of incentives pushing people in this direction. And it almost seemed like the utilities were going along with it without a fight.

Back home, I am often asked by clients, if installing solar panels or erecting turbines is a good investment to make. The answer of course depends on why they are doing it. If the intent is to be used as a marketing tool, or simply because the company feels it’s the right thing to do, then yes. But if someone in Ohio today is pursuing renewables as a cost savings measure, then no, it is not a recommendation that I would make.

So why would someone who promotes energy efficiency and sustainability not recommend renewables? Let’s look at Ohio’s recent renewable history to better understand.

Colorado Pic

At the beginning of the decade, it appeared as though Ohio was making strides within the renewable sector. This included creating thousands of “Green jobs” along with massive increases in wind and solar production. Despite this, Ohio still ranked near the bottom in renewable electricity and generation capacity compared to the nation.

Over two-thirds of electricity in Ohio is derived from coal, and another twenty percent from natural gas. Only 1.5 percent was from renewable sources in 2010. To make matters worse, the renewable energy industry has shifted dramatically in just the last year. In 2014, the state legislature passed Ohio Senate Bill 310, imposing a two-year moratorium on Ohio’s renewable energy standards.

I am hugely in favor of developing renewable energy sources through improved technology and more cost effective production. The reality though is Ohio is not ready for that. Ohio is still a coal state and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. Also, it’s probably going to take a federal effort along with public-private partnerships for investment in renewables to garner the necessary results.

When working with clients, my job is simple. Improve their energy portfolio and identify cost savings with strategies that are effective and efficient. Unfortunately, renewable options today don’t fit into that paradigm. Until they do, I will continue to advocate for smart efficient solutions that meet the unique needs of the businesses I work with.

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Identify Energy Solutions with an Energy Advisor

The energy industry today is more dynamic and complex than ever before. The advent of new technologies, shifting energy costs, and the constant barrage of federal and state legislation, has made it extremely difficult for consumers to stay adequately informed. For these reasons, EPCO is a huge proponent of the idea that every business should have an energy advisor.

The concept of an energy advisor hasn’t fully taken hold throughout the marketplace. Perhaps it is because most businesses don’t clearly understand what an energy advisor is, or, how they would use one. Think of it in these terms. A typical business will utilize a lawyer for legal needs or a CPA for accounting. There are many professionals and firms that can provide the same consultative services for managing your energy consumption.

Advisor Image

For smaller enterprises, you may leverage the expertise of an energy advisor to negotiate better rates for your gas and electric utility. But if you are a larger consumer, like most clients I work with, your energy management needs could be substantial. The right advisor can help identify and craft energy solutions for a myriad of concerns. This may include lighting audits and retrofits, power factor correction studies, or improvement to process cooling / heating performance.

You want to be sure to work with the right advisor, not all are created equal. Each client that EPCO collaborates with receives a unique and customized energy evaluation. No two businesses have the same needs or operate in the same way. Your energy consultant should provide you with a distinctive energy saving solutions that will allow you to make immediate and lasting cuts to your operating budgets.

Working in concert with you, and focusing on your specific needs, a reputable advisor will design a sensible compilation of measures that provide for turnkey energy efficiency solutions. Ultimately, you will want to take a long-term planning approach, leveraging short term savings opportunities that are invested into more capital intensive projects. This diversifies energy portfolios and ensures a cost effective and sustainable path into the future.

There are many more factors to include. You will want to leverage potential financing and rebates as well as develop a structured strategic plan to help guide you. The first step though is to find and work with the right team of professionals. The world of energy procurement and management is virtually the Wild West. Make sure you are coming armed with the right support.

 

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